Title

The Cost of Oversight: How the Continental Congress Almost Lost the American Revolution

Presenter Information

Keiler Swartz

Department

History and Political Science

Major

History/Education

Research Advisor

Gragg, Larry Dale, 1950-

Advisor's Department

History and Political Science

Abstract

The American Revolution was one of the most important events in both American and human histories. While this war is well known as being a war of defiance where a republican government attempted to break free from a monarchy, it should also be known as a war in which the legislative body of the new American states took a very active role in the control of the Continental Army. General Washington was an avid proponent of civilian control over the military so he allowed the Second Continental Congress to have a large say in how the American forces operated. Ultimately, due to a rapidly inflating currency and general fear of standing armies, they failed to adequately supply the troops. Despite the flaws of civilian control that were brought to light during the war, the sense of distrust between the government and the military remain today.

Biography

Keiler Swartz is a senior working towards a Bachelor of Arts in History and Secondary Teacher Certification. He is heavily involved with student government both at Missouri S&T and throughout the Midwest. Keiler is looking forward to teaching history and government in a high school setting.

Research Category

Arts and Humanities

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Carver Room

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 10:00 am - 10:30 am

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Apr 11th, 10:00 AM Apr 11th, 10:30 AM

The Cost of Oversight: How the Continental Congress Almost Lost the American Revolution

Carver Room

The American Revolution was one of the most important events in both American and human histories. While this war is well known as being a war of defiance where a republican government attempted to break free from a monarchy, it should also be known as a war in which the legislative body of the new American states took a very active role in the control of the Continental Army. General Washington was an avid proponent of civilian control over the military so he allowed the Second Continental Congress to have a large say in how the American forces operated. Ultimately, due to a rapidly inflating currency and general fear of standing armies, they failed to adequately supply the troops. Despite the flaws of civilian control that were brought to light during the war, the sense of distrust between the government and the military remain today.