Title

Cellular Hitchhiking on Microparticles to Alleviate Skin Injury

Presenter Information

Chase Evan Herman

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Barua, Sutapa

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Funding Source

Principal Investigator’s Start-Up

Abstract

Regenerative medicine holds great potential for the future treatment of acute burn injury. However, current skin graft technology does not provide any structural support to transplanted cells, and it also causes scar formation. To combat these challenges, the present study focuses on a rapidly developing field of research: engineering microparticles to provide structural support to cells while in suspension.

Microparticles have tremendous potential as scaffolding systems to carry multiple exogenous cells because of their high surface area to volume ratio. Microparticles can further be utilized as growth factor delivery systems to promote cell proliferation.

In this study, microparticles are synthesized from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), a biodegradable copolymer. Fibronectin, a glycoprotein involved in wound healing, is conjugated onto the surface of PLGA microparticles for seeding viable cells. Cells will be grown in suspension on the microparticles. We call it “cellular hitchhiking”. This de novo technique has versatile applications including skin regeneration.

Biography

Chase Evan Herman is a 2nd-year undergraduate student from the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. Since his middle school days, Chase has enthusiastically participated in many research and design projects. During high school, he twice competed in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), with projects firstly in civil engineering and then biochemistry. While in Los Angeles for ISEF, he was privileged to personally meet Robert Horvitz, a Nobel laureate. Listening to Dr. Horvitz and other laureates talk about their work set Chase’s excitement for scientific research ablaze. Chase returned to this lab last summer. Furthermore, he served as a tutor for general chemistry during the fall 2015 semester. Currently, Chase is diligently progressing in his studies and is actively involved in Dr. Sutapa Barua’s biomaterials lab.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Engineering poster session, First place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

Cellular Hitchhiking on Microparticles to Alleviate Skin Injury

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Regenerative medicine holds great potential for the future treatment of acute burn injury. However, current skin graft technology does not provide any structural support to transplanted cells, and it also causes scar formation. To combat these challenges, the present study focuses on a rapidly developing field of research: engineering microparticles to provide structural support to cells while in suspension.

Microparticles have tremendous potential as scaffolding systems to carry multiple exogenous cells because of their high surface area to volume ratio. Microparticles can further be utilized as growth factor delivery systems to promote cell proliferation.

In this study, microparticles are synthesized from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), a biodegradable copolymer. Fibronectin, a glycoprotein involved in wound healing, is conjugated onto the surface of PLGA microparticles for seeding viable cells. Cells will be grown in suspension on the microparticles. We call it “cellular hitchhiking”. This de novo technique has versatile applications including skin regeneration.