Title

Development of CO₂ Removal Systems for NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems

Presenter Information

Stephen Eastman

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Rezaei, Fateme

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Funding Source

NASA-Missouri Space Grant Consortium

Abstract

In enclosed environments such as spacecraft cabins, CO2 concentration is required to be below 0.5% because long term exposure to CO2 higher than 0.5% can create severe health problems. Therefore, removal of CO2 from the cabin atmosphere is a critical function of any spacecraft’s life support system. We plan to investigate the use of materials with promising performance (high capacity and stability) for removing CO2 from spacecraft cabins and space stations. The objective of this work is to test several metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) including MOF-74, MIL-101 and UiO-66 in a monolithic support in a CO2 removal system that would be compact and lightweight, for use in space exploration. The adsorbent-support surface interactions play an important role in obtaining a well-defined, robust and uniform MOF distribution in the monolith; therefore, we aim to investigate this important parameter using various support and adsorbent materials.

Biography

Stephen Eastman is a Junior in Chemical Engineering. He is a member of the S&T chapter American Institute of Chemical Engineers as well as the Chemical Engineering car. His interests include: Outdoor Activities, Electronics, Video Games and Chemistry.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 11th, 1:00 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

Development of CO₂ Removal Systems for NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems

Upper Atrium/Hallway

In enclosed environments such as spacecraft cabins, CO2 concentration is required to be below 0.5% because long term exposure to CO2 higher than 0.5% can create severe health problems. Therefore, removal of CO2 from the cabin atmosphere is a critical function of any spacecraft’s life support system. We plan to investigate the use of materials with promising performance (high capacity and stability) for removing CO2 from spacecraft cabins and space stations. The objective of this work is to test several metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) including MOF-74, MIL-101 and UiO-66 in a monolithic support in a CO2 removal system that would be compact and lightweight, for use in space exploration. The adsorbent-support surface interactions play an important role in obtaining a well-defined, robust and uniform MOF distribution in the monolith; therefore, we aim to investigate this important parameter using various support and adsorbent materials.