Title

Teaching Kids to Give a Crap

Presenter Information

Darrell Wallace

Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Major

Civil Engineering

Research Advisor

Oerther, Daniel B.

Advisor's Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Abstract

Diarrheal disease kills an estimated 1.8 million people each year, the majority of whom are under five years of age - accounting for approximately 20% of all deaths for children under five. The majority of these deaths are occurring between the ages of six months and three years of age. Lack of safe water contributes significantly to the high incidence of diarrheal disease and chronic malnutrition in Guatemala. Parasites, transferred by waterborne contamination, consume nutrients, aggravate malnutrition, retard children’s physical development and result in poor school attendance and performance. Our goal through this research is to educate children in Guatemala, mainly villages that do not have proper water filtration, on the importance for clean water and how safe water keeps them healthy. Teaching these children the basics of how a Bio Sand filter works and the proper way to use the filter. We expect that our approach will improve the knowledge of wellness, ultimately improving health and possibly saving lives.

Biography

Darrell Wallace is a senior at Missouri University of Science and Technology studying Civil Engineering. While on campus Darrell is involved with Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity, Steel Bridge Design Team, Intramural Manager's Association, and Blue Key Honor Society. In Darrell’s spare time he enjoys rock climbing, playing golf, and spending time with his family.

Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 11:45 AM

Teaching Kids to Give a Crap

Upper Atrium/Hall

Diarrheal disease kills an estimated 1.8 million people each year, the majority of whom are under five years of age - accounting for approximately 20% of all deaths for children under five. The majority of these deaths are occurring between the ages of six months and three years of age. Lack of safe water contributes significantly to the high incidence of diarrheal disease and chronic malnutrition in Guatemala. Parasites, transferred by waterborne contamination, consume nutrients, aggravate malnutrition, retard children’s physical development and result in poor school attendance and performance. Our goal through this research is to educate children in Guatemala, mainly villages that do not have proper water filtration, on the importance for clean water and how safe water keeps them healthy. Teaching these children the basics of how a Bio Sand filter works and the proper way to use the filter. We expect that our approach will improve the knowledge of wellness, ultimately improving health and possibly saving lives.