Title

Generalization of Stereotype Threat Interventions in Women

Presenter Information

Natasha Stoneking

Department

Psychological Science

Major

Psychology

Research Advisor

Klein, Brandi

Advisor's Department

Psychological Science

Abstract

Stereotype threat refers to a situation in which a stereotype about a person might be confirmed, and performance decreases as a result. Interventions designed to combat stereotype threat can narrow or close the gap between stereotyped groups and their peers.

The current study examines whether an informative intervention tailored to one threat (“women underperform at math”) will later protect against a different threat (“women underperform at mental rotation”) and vice versa. Data collection is in progress. We expect that those exposed to stereotype threat without the intervention will have the lowest scores, and those who receive the intervention will score as well as those not exposed to stereotype threat. This would indicate that an intervention for one threat generalized to a second threat, and that stereotype threat interventions need not be tailored to specific threats.

Biography

Natasha Stoneking is a senior in psychology at Missouri S&T. Since Fall 2011, she has been the president of the Free Thinkers Society, a philosophical discussion group. She currently works as a peer tutor at Missouri S&T's Writing Center. Her interests include dogs, hiking, and traveling. Natasha hopes to pursue a career in cognitive neuroscience research.

Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Social science poster session, First place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 11:45 AM

Generalization of Stereotype Threat Interventions in Women

Upper Atrium/Hall

Stereotype threat refers to a situation in which a stereotype about a person might be confirmed, and performance decreases as a result. Interventions designed to combat stereotype threat can narrow or close the gap between stereotyped groups and their peers.

The current study examines whether an informative intervention tailored to one threat (“women underperform at math”) will later protect against a different threat (“women underperform at mental rotation”) and vice versa. Data collection is in progress. We expect that those exposed to stereotype threat without the intervention will have the lowest scores, and those who receive the intervention will score as well as those not exposed to stereotype threat. This would indicate that an intervention for one threat generalized to a second threat, and that stereotype threat interventions need not be tailored to specific threats.