Title

Skin Uptake of Gas Phase Methamphetamine: Effect of Clothing

Presenter Information

Melissa Buechlein

Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Major

Environmental Engineering

Research Advisor

Morrison, Glenn

Advisor's Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Abstract

A fluid-mechanical boundary layer that surrounds the human body acts as a resistance to skin uptake of chemicals from the air. Clothing has the potential to emit or absorb chemicals depending on the concentration difference between the material and the air. We hypothesized that clothing contaminated with a chemical reduces the effective boundary layer thickness which causes the skin to absorb chemicals at a higher rate. A cotton shirt material equilibrated with the concentration of a 10 L chamber at ~77 ppb methamphetamine was positioned at fixed distances (1 to 20 mm) from filters with ~5 mg of artificial skin oil. Each filter was immersed in 6.5 mL of 1% ethyl acetate in hexane then analyzed using a gas chromatography- mass spectrometry. These findings support the hypothesis that the flux from air-equilibrated clothing to skin is higher than from air to bare skin; suggesting that clothing-to-skin transfer may be an important vector for uptake of many chemicals.

Biography

Melissa Buechlein is a senior in environmental engineering with a minor in geological engineering. She is a member of the Eta Theta chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha, of Chi Epsilon (the civil engineering honors fraternity), of Tau Beta Pi (the engineering honor society), and EcoMiners (a Missouri S&T going-green club). Her interests include: outdoor activities, sports, drawing, and baking.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Sciences oral presentation, Third place

Location

Carver Room

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 9:00 am - 9:30 am

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 9:30 AM

Skin Uptake of Gas Phase Methamphetamine: Effect of Clothing

Carver Room

A fluid-mechanical boundary layer that surrounds the human body acts as a resistance to skin uptake of chemicals from the air. Clothing has the potential to emit or absorb chemicals depending on the concentration difference between the material and the air. We hypothesized that clothing contaminated with a chemical reduces the effective boundary layer thickness which causes the skin to absorb chemicals at a higher rate. A cotton shirt material equilibrated with the concentration of a 10 L chamber at ~77 ppb methamphetamine was positioned at fixed distances (1 to 20 mm) from filters with ~5 mg of artificial skin oil. Each filter was immersed in 6.5 mL of 1% ethyl acetate in hexane then analyzed using a gas chromatography- mass spectrometry. These findings support the hypothesis that the flux from air-equilibrated clothing to skin is higher than from air to bare skin; suggesting that clothing-to-skin transfer may be an important vector for uptake of many chemicals.