Title

Conversion of Borate Glass to Bioactive Micro-tubes

Presenter Information

Nick Santoro

Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Major

Ceramic Engineering

Research Advisor

Rahaman, M. N., 1950-

Advisor's Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Funding Source

Center for Biomedical Science and Engineering

Abstract

Fibers of a calcium-lithium-borate glass were converted to hydroxyapatite (HA) in a KH2PO4 solution. Hollow HA micro tubes were obtained by removing the unreacted glass cores. The conversion behavior was studied with varying KH2PO4 concentrations (0.01 M, 0.02 M, and 0.10 M). For the KH2PO4 concentrations of 0.01 M and 0.02 M, glass fibers had similar conversion rates, and had a weight loss of approximately 12% and 14% respectively after 3 days. When the KH2PO4 concentration was increased to 0.10 M, glass fibers showed a much faster conversion rate and had a weight loss of approximately 60% after 3 days. The effects of heat treatments (500 °C, 700 °C, and 900 °C) on the strength of the HA tubes is currently being studied. The in vivo performance of the HA tubes is also being studied by using a rat calvarial defect model.

Biography

Nick Santoro is a senior in Ceramic Engineering and has been working as an undergraduate research assistant for Dr. Rahaman’s biomaterials group for the last year and worked for Dr. Brows’ glass research group for a year. He is a member of Keramos and Kappa Kappa Psi.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 11:45 AM

Conversion of Borate Glass to Bioactive Micro-tubes

Upper Atrium/Hall

Fibers of a calcium-lithium-borate glass were converted to hydroxyapatite (HA) in a KH2PO4 solution. Hollow HA micro tubes were obtained by removing the unreacted glass cores. The conversion behavior was studied with varying KH2PO4 concentrations (0.01 M, 0.02 M, and 0.10 M). For the KH2PO4 concentrations of 0.01 M and 0.02 M, glass fibers had similar conversion rates, and had a weight loss of approximately 12% and 14% respectively after 3 days. When the KH2PO4 concentration was increased to 0.10 M, glass fibers showed a much faster conversion rate and had a weight loss of approximately 60% after 3 days. The effects of heat treatments (500 °C, 700 °C, and 900 °C) on the strength of the HA tubes is currently being studied. The in vivo performance of the HA tubes is also being studied by using a rat calvarial defect model.