Title

Does a Hof1 mutation that prevents phosphorylation in the PEST domain affect both haploid and diploid yeast cell?

Presenter Information

Katie Nelson

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Experience Program (OURE)

Abstract

Cytokinesis is the last stage in cellular division when the cell splits into two daughter cells, which must be regulated to ensure that cell separation occurs at the right place and time. Budding yeast are a good model organism to study since they use similar processes and proteins as higher eukaryotes use in cytokinesis. The Hof1 protein in S. cerevisiae is a member of a conserved protein family; it is localized at the bud neck and is required for efficient cytokinesis. Previously our lab showed that a Hof1 allele that prevents phosphorylation of the PEST motif causes a smaller bud neck and slower rate of actomyosin ring contraction during cytokinesis in haploid cells. Because Hof1 interacts with a protein that is required in haploid, but not diploid cells, we are examining the bud neck and cytokinesis phenotype of the Hof1 mutation in diploid cells using live cell time-lapse microscopy.

Biography

Katie is currently a junior majoring in Biological Sciences with a minor in Chemistry and Psychology. She is a member of the biological honors society Phi sigma, is a certified Joe’s Peer educator, and is the Public Relations Officer of the International Genetically Engineered Machines design team. After graduation she plans on attending graduate school for Genetic Counseling.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 11:45 AM

Does a Hof1 mutation that prevents phosphorylation in the PEST domain affect both haploid and diploid yeast cell?

Upper Atrium/Hall

Cytokinesis is the last stage in cellular division when the cell splits into two daughter cells, which must be regulated to ensure that cell separation occurs at the right place and time. Budding yeast are a good model organism to study since they use similar processes and proteins as higher eukaryotes use in cytokinesis. The Hof1 protein in S. cerevisiae is a member of a conserved protein family; it is localized at the bud neck and is required for efficient cytokinesis. Previously our lab showed that a Hof1 allele that prevents phosphorylation of the PEST motif causes a smaller bud neck and slower rate of actomyosin ring contraction during cytokinesis in haploid cells. Because Hof1 interacts with a protein that is required in haploid, but not diploid cells, we are examining the bud neck and cytokinesis phenotype of the Hof1 mutation in diploid cells using live cell time-lapse microscopy.