Title

The Effect of Starvation on Glucose Levels in Wild Type Drosophila and Circadian Rhythm Mutants

Presenter Information

Danielle Meyer

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biology

Research Advisor

Thimgan, Matthew S.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research (OURE)

Abstract

Individuals with Night Eating Syndrome wake up in the middle of the night and can’t fall asleep until they’ve eaten something. We hypothesized that metabolic state may underlie this change in sleep and wake. Starvation results in waking in Drosophila and likely affects glucose levels in Drosophila, and those effects may be different in flies with normal circadian rhythms versus flies without. We investigated this relationship by starving each type of fly for different periods of time between 4 and 29 hours and then measuring all sources of glucose, including trehalose and glycogen. The results have shown that in wild type flies, glucose levels decrease with starvation until about 24 hours, where they increase due to utilization of glycogen. In the mutants, glucose levels stay constant throughout starvation. Therefore, we concluded that there is a clear relationship in wild type flies, and that the circadian rhythm mutation disrupts this relationship.

Biography

Danielle Meyer is an undergraduate student at Missouri University of Science and Technology. She is majoring in biology and minoring in chemistry and psychology. Danielle is primarily interested in research that involves aspects of both biology and psychology, such as sleep. She has been working in Dr. Thimgan’s Sleep Biology lab for approximately nine months.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 11:45 AM

The Effect of Starvation on Glucose Levels in Wild Type Drosophila and Circadian Rhythm Mutants

Upper Atrium/Hall

Individuals with Night Eating Syndrome wake up in the middle of the night and can’t fall asleep until they’ve eaten something. We hypothesized that metabolic state may underlie this change in sleep and wake. Starvation results in waking in Drosophila and likely affects glucose levels in Drosophila, and those effects may be different in flies with normal circadian rhythms versus flies without. We investigated this relationship by starving each type of fly for different periods of time between 4 and 29 hours and then measuring all sources of glucose, including trehalose and glycogen. The results have shown that in wild type flies, glucose levels decrease with starvation until about 24 hours, where they increase due to utilization of glycogen. In the mutants, glucose levels stay constant throughout starvation. Therefore, we concluded that there is a clear relationship in wild type flies, and that the circadian rhythm mutation disrupts this relationship.