Title

Quantitative Characterization of Sieyal Fault in the Aswan Area, Egypt

Presenter Information

Michael Little

Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Major

Geology and Geophysics

Research Advisor

Hogan, John Patrick

Advisor's Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE)

Abstract

The Sieyal fault is in the western desert of Egypt about 100 kilometers southwest of Aswan. The remote location of this fault system makes field study very difficult and expensive. With little to no vegetation cover, geologic units and structures related to this fault are visible in satellite imagery. Using remote sensing techniques and imagery from Google Earth, data regarding fault segment length, orientation, linkage style, and density can be quantified in order to characterize the fault system. Through the analysis of this data, information about the tectonic history of the Egyptian desert may be obtained. Two distinct regions were identified in this study, a western region and an eastern region. The data collected from these two regions showed key differences with respect to linkage style and orientation. These differences are due to a change in stratigraphic units.

Biography

Michael is currently a Geology and Geophysics student graduating in May 2014. While at Missouri S&T, Michael has served as a member of Sigma Gamma Epsilon and President of Sigma Pi Fraternity. In fall 2014, Michael will begin work on a Master’s degree in Geological Engineering at either UC-Berkeley, Colorado School of Mines, or UW- Madison.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 11:45 AM

Quantitative Characterization of Sieyal Fault in the Aswan Area, Egypt

Upper Atrium/Hall

The Sieyal fault is in the western desert of Egypt about 100 kilometers southwest of Aswan. The remote location of this fault system makes field study very difficult and expensive. With little to no vegetation cover, geologic units and structures related to this fault are visible in satellite imagery. Using remote sensing techniques and imagery from Google Earth, data regarding fault segment length, orientation, linkage style, and density can be quantified in order to characterize the fault system. Through the analysis of this data, information about the tectonic history of the Egyptian desert may be obtained. Two distinct regions were identified in this study, a western region and an eastern region. The data collected from these two regions showed key differences with respect to linkage style and orientation. These differences are due to a change in stratigraphic units.