Title

Design and Construction of a Novel Chirped Pulse Fourier Transform Microwave (CP-FTMW) Spectrometer

Presenter Information

David Gillcrist

Department

Physics

Major

Physics

Research Advisor

Grubbs, Garry S.

Advisor's Department

Chemistry

Funding Source

MS&T Startup Funds

Abstract

Microwave spectroscopy is a technique utilized to elucidate the structure of molecules via their rotational transitions. Traditionally, the Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) variety of this technique has been narrowband in nature resulting in long spectral acquisition times and large sample consumption. Pioneered by the work of Pate and coworkers, a new technique was created to allow for the broadband acquisition of the rotational spectra named the chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometer.1 Recent technological advancements in the field of radiofrequency/microwave engineering, however, have allowed for a new, simpler circuit design across the entire range of the typical spectrometer, 6-18 GHz. Tests of the new circuit design and viability of the spectrometer will be presented.

Biography

David Gillcrist is from Kansas City, Missouri and is 19 years old. He is a second semester freshman at Missouri University of Science & Technology, and is majoring in Physics. David is involved in Student Council and is a member of the Theta Xi fraternity on campus. His projected graduation is in May 2017.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 11:45 AM

Design and Construction of a Novel Chirped Pulse Fourier Transform Microwave (CP-FTMW) Spectrometer

Upper Atrium/Hall

Microwave spectroscopy is a technique utilized to elucidate the structure of molecules via their rotational transitions. Traditionally, the Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) variety of this technique has been narrowband in nature resulting in long spectral acquisition times and large sample consumption. Pioneered by the work of Pate and coworkers, a new technique was created to allow for the broadband acquisition of the rotational spectra named the chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometer.1 Recent technological advancements in the field of radiofrequency/microwave engineering, however, have allowed for a new, simpler circuit design across the entire range of the typical spectrometer, 6-18 GHz. Tests of the new circuit design and viability of the spectrometer will be presented.