Title

Microbial Art

Presenter Information

Carol Baker

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biology

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Opportunities for Undergraduate Experience Program (OURE)

Abstract

This research project was focused on using bacteria to create art. This included researching their growth rates and diameter in which they grow by the hour, how they interacted with each other, and different application techniques. There were also transformations that were done in order to get new colors that are not natural for that bacteria type. Different equipment was used to maximize the effects of the bacteria. There was UV light, a plastic needle (used for application), and a 12 by 17 acrylic box petri dish used for displays.

Biography

Carol Baker is a Junior in Biological Sciences at MS&T. After she graduates in May of 2015, she plans on going on to get a Masters in Marine Microbiology somewhere on the East Coast. Besides doing undergraduate research, she is also a Senior Resident Assistant for the Department of Residential life. She hopes to one day do research into how the climate is effecting the microbial life in the ocean and how that effects the animals that live there.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

Comments

Joint project with Alex Evans, Sarah Moeller

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 11:45 AM

Microbial Art

Upper Atrium/Hall

This research project was focused on using bacteria to create art. This included researching their growth rates and diameter in which they grow by the hour, how they interacted with each other, and different application techniques. There were also transformations that were done in order to get new colors that are not natural for that bacteria type. Different equipment was used to maximize the effects of the bacteria. There was UV light, a plastic needle (used for application), and a 12 by 17 acrylic box petri dish used for displays.