Title

Reversing the Effects of Vitiligo using a Synthetic Biology Approach

Presenter Information

Mondae Atughonu

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.
Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Second Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

Vitiligo is a condition that causes depigmentation of parts of the skin. It occurs when melanocytes, the cells responsible for skin pigmentation, die or are unable to function. It is hypothesized that this device will reverse the effects of vitiligo by targeting dying melanocytes and releasing the peptide hormone a-MSH. Through the binding of a-MSH to the MC1R G-protein coupled receptor, melanin production will be induced through the maturation or switching of melanin type. Melanocyte pH, governed by the P-protein, will determine tyrosinase enzyme activity to control the initial step in melanin production, or TYRP complex formation to begin melanogenesis and melanosomal maturation.

Biography

Mondae is a senior majoring in Biological Sciences, with minors in Chemistry and Studio Art. In addition, Mondae is the current president of the Association for Black Students, and the Corresponding Secretary/Editor to the Sphinx for the Epsilon Psi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., both here on the Missouri University of Science and Technology campus. As an inclusive, creative, and determined person all his academic career, Mondae has earned the respects of those around him, and now uses his knowledge of his degree path and leadership experience to be a leader at his school and in his community.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 11:45 AM

Reversing the Effects of Vitiligo using a Synthetic Biology Approach

Upper Atrium/Hall

Vitiligo is a condition that causes depigmentation of parts of the skin. It occurs when melanocytes, the cells responsible for skin pigmentation, die or are unable to function. It is hypothesized that this device will reverse the effects of vitiligo by targeting dying melanocytes and releasing the peptide hormone a-MSH. Through the binding of a-MSH to the MC1R G-protein coupled receptor, melanin production will be induced through the maturation or switching of melanin type. Melanocyte pH, governed by the P-protein, will determine tyrosinase enzyme activity to control the initial step in melanin production, or TYRP complex formation to begin melanogenesis and melanosomal maturation.