Title

Commodity Chemical Production Using Extremophillic Bacteria

Presenter Information

Olivia Fleming

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Mormile, Melanie R.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

In our changing world, it is becoming more and more important to be able to create things in an environmentally benign way. Currently, a majority of commodity chemicals come from fossil fuels, not an environmental-friendly option. An alternative to some chemical production is to use microorganisms to produce industrially relevant compounds. In addition, it would be beneficial to produce these compounds from waste materials. Currently, glycerol is a waste product from biodiesel production. Enrichments will be prepared from sediment from Red Lake, located at the Rocky Fork/Finger Lakes Conservation Area, just north of Columbia, Missouri, to obtain microorganisms that can ferment glycerol under acidophilic conditions. The use of extremophilic bacteria provides numerous benefits, such as a lack of contamination. Ideally, this process will give us the ability to created commodity chemicals in an efficient and environmentally benign manner.

Biography

Olivia Fleming is a sophomore in biological sciences.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 1:00 PM Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

Commodity Chemical Production Using Extremophillic Bacteria

Upper Atrium/Hall

In our changing world, it is becoming more and more important to be able to create things in an environmentally benign way. Currently, a majority of commodity chemicals come from fossil fuels, not an environmental-friendly option. An alternative to some chemical production is to use microorganisms to produce industrially relevant compounds. In addition, it would be beneficial to produce these compounds from waste materials. Currently, glycerol is a waste product from biodiesel production. Enrichments will be prepared from sediment from Red Lake, located at the Rocky Fork/Finger Lakes Conservation Area, just north of Columbia, Missouri, to obtain microorganisms that can ferment glycerol under acidophilic conditions. The use of extremophilic bacteria provides numerous benefits, such as a lack of contamination. Ideally, this process will give us the ability to created commodity chemicals in an efficient and environmentally benign manner.