Title

Characterization of Biodiesel Using Various Feedstocks

Presenter Information

Joshua Heath

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Smith, Joseph D.

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Funding Source

MST Energy and Research Development Center

Abstract

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in biodiesel as a source of renewable energy. It burns cleaner than petroleum and can be produced fairly easily with the right equipment. Biodiesel can be used in many applications such as in motor vehicles, aircraft, and as heating oil. One of the benefits of biodiesel is the fact that it can be made from a variety of feedstocks. There are several feeds that have been chosen to be tested. Corn is the most abundant feed in the Midwest, soybean has been chosen since it has become a standard in biodiesel production, canola oil is the most prominent feed used in Europe leading to the question of the quality difference, and used cooking oil to see if the waste can be put to good use. This project compares the characteristics of different biodiesels made from different feedstocks and will provide valuable insight on the optimal feedstock for diesel.

Biography

Joshua Heath is currently a sophomore at Missouri University of Science and Technology pursuing a degree in chemical engineering. This is his first year participating in the OURE program at Missouri S&T. He is also a member of iGEM and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. After graduation, he is hoping to go into a career in bioengineering.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Comments

Joint project with Shaun Tennyson, Alexander Carney, Melissa Vidal

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Apr 16th, 1:00 PM Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

Characterization of Biodiesel Using Various Feedstocks

Upper Atrium/Hall

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in biodiesel as a source of renewable energy. It burns cleaner than petroleum and can be produced fairly easily with the right equipment. Biodiesel can be used in many applications such as in motor vehicles, aircraft, and as heating oil. One of the benefits of biodiesel is the fact that it can be made from a variety of feedstocks. There are several feeds that have been chosen to be tested. Corn is the most abundant feed in the Midwest, soybean has been chosen since it has become a standard in biodiesel production, canola oil is the most prominent feed used in Europe leading to the question of the quality difference, and used cooking oil to see if the waste can be put to good use. This project compares the characteristics of different biodiesels made from different feedstocks and will provide valuable insight on the optimal feedstock for diesel.