Title

Applications of Active Aeroelastic Wing Technology

Presenter Information

Emily Dierkes

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Mechanical Engineering

Research Advisor

Isaac, Kakkattukuzhy M.

Advisor's Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Funding Source

Opportunities for Undergraduate Experience Program (OURE)

Abstract

A new wing system has been developed using Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) Technology. This system uses an actuator made from two aluminum alignment rods that fit together to apply a vertical displacement. Camber is introduced into the wing by the displacement of the actuator. Beginning with a NACA 0012 airfoil, which has no lift at zero angle of attack, the displacement will increase the camber of the wing, providing lift at zero angle of attack. It is expected that wind tunnel testing will support this hypothesis, and that drag will be reduced when the actuators are not displaced. By utilizing the high life configuration for takeoff and a low lift configuration for cruise conditions, the design will require less fuel consumption.

Biography

Emily Dierkes is a senior studying Mechanical Engineering at Missouri S&T. In her time with the MAE department, she has become involved with numerous projects, including undergraduate research and the Advanced Aero Vehicle Group. After she completes her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Emily plans to work full time with Boeing assisting SLS design and analysis.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Engineering poster session, Third place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Comments

Joint project with John Schaefer

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Apr 16th, 1:00 PM Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

Applications of Active Aeroelastic Wing Technology

Upper Atrium/Hall

A new wing system has been developed using Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) Technology. This system uses an actuator made from two aluminum alignment rods that fit together to apply a vertical displacement. Camber is introduced into the wing by the displacement of the actuator. Beginning with a NACA 0012 airfoil, which has no lift at zero angle of attack, the displacement will increase the camber of the wing, providing lift at zero angle of attack. It is expected that wind tunnel testing will support this hypothesis, and that drag will be reduced when the actuators are not displaced. By utilizing the high life configuration for takeoff and a low lift configuration for cruise conditions, the design will require less fuel consumption.