Title

The Production, Analysis, and Applications of Graphene

Presenter Information

Clayton Craig

Department

Physics

Major

Physics and Applied Mathematics

Research Advisor

Story, J. Greg

Advisor's Department

Physics

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Advanced Physics Lab

Abstract

Graphene is a two-dimensional crystalline structure consisting of densely packed carbon atoms in a hexagonal pattern. Graphene is strong, nearly transparent, and is an excellent conductor of both heat and electricity. As such it has found many applications such as theoretical drug delivery systems and new transistors many times faster than modern silicone transistors. In 2010 Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov at the University of Manchester won the Nobel Prize in Physics for their work in graphene. Following their methods numerous samples of graphene were created using household sticky tape. In addition samples of reduced graphite oxide were created focusing intense light onto graphite oxide samples. This method produced large enough samples to create capacitors from.

Biography

Clayton is a Junior in Physics and Applied Mathematics with plans to graduate in May 2015. He intends to pursue a graduate degree in physics after graduation and perform research in the fields of nanomaterials and particle physics.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Carver Room

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 10:30 am - 11:00 am

Comments

Join project with Giannino Lusicic, Alexander Mark

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Apr 16th, 10:30 AM Apr 16th, 11:00 AM

The Production, Analysis, and Applications of Graphene

Carver Room

Graphene is a two-dimensional crystalline structure consisting of densely packed carbon atoms in a hexagonal pattern. Graphene is strong, nearly transparent, and is an excellent conductor of both heat and electricity. As such it has found many applications such as theoretical drug delivery systems and new transistors many times faster than modern silicone transistors. In 2010 Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov at the University of Manchester won the Nobel Prize in Physics for their work in graphene. Following their methods numerous samples of graphene were created using household sticky tape. In addition samples of reduced graphite oxide were created focusing intense light onto graphite oxide samples. This method produced large enough samples to create capacitors from.