Title

Effects of B3 Bioactive Glass Length on in Vivo Angiogenesis

Presenter Information

Caleb Trecazzi

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Pre-medical Chemistry and Biology

Research Advisor

Day, D. E.
Mohammadkhah, Ali

Advisor's Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Funding Source

OURE Fellows Program Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

Borate-based 13-93 B3 bioactive glass scaffolds have been shown to promote angiogenesis in vivo and have been used successfully in clinical trials for wound healing. This study will investigate various scaffold lengths in order to determine the maximum length that a glass scaffold may be before angiogenesis is no longer present within the scaffold. Two separate 13-93 B3 bioactive glass compositions will be compared in this experiment--one with the inclusion of copper and one without--while using the same experimental design of varying scaffold length in order to determine the effects that the addition of copper may have on angiogenic promotion. Toxicological analysis will be conducted per each bioactive glass composition in order to determine the effects that each composition has in vivo.

Biography

Caleb Trecazzi is a junior who is pursuing a dual bachelor’s degree in pre-medical chemistry and biology. He has assisted in the iGEM laboratory under the supervision of Levi Palmer, the current iGEM Laboratory Manager, in performing gel electrophoresis, cell culture preparation and plating, and briefly in the creation of competent cells. He has taken and successfully completed a research course (Math 390, Summer 2010) with Dr. Matt Insall in the mathematics department. Together their research team studied lattice theory, nonstandard analysis, and did minor work with a project titled “The Book of Squares.”

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Proposal Oral Applicant

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Fellows 14-15 Awarded

Location

Turner Room

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2014, 2:00 pm - 2:20 pm

Comments

Joint project with Anthony Bitar

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Apr 16th, 2:00 PM Apr 16th, 2:20 PM

Effects of B3 Bioactive Glass Length on in Vivo Angiogenesis

Turner Room

Borate-based 13-93 B3 bioactive glass scaffolds have been shown to promote angiogenesis in vivo and have been used successfully in clinical trials for wound healing. This study will investigate various scaffold lengths in order to determine the maximum length that a glass scaffold may be before angiogenesis is no longer present within the scaffold. Two separate 13-93 B3 bioactive glass compositions will be compared in this experiment--one with the inclusion of copper and one without--while using the same experimental design of varying scaffold length in order to determine the effects that the addition of copper may have on angiogenic promotion. Toxicological analysis will be conducted per each bioactive glass composition in order to determine the effects that each composition has in vivo.