Title

Family Interactions and Mood

Presenter Information

Emily Gardner

Department

Psychological Science

Major

Psychology

Research Advisor

Sharpsteen, Don

Advisor's Department

Psychological Science

Funding Source

Missouri S& T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

Spanking as a form of discipline is prevalent in the United States, with over 90% of Americans spanking their children. Considering the prevalence of spanking, it has been a topic of study for years. While earlier studies focus primarily on the negative effects of spanking, more recent studies examine the causes of spanking. The frustration-aggression hypothesis proposes that frustration leads to aggressive behavior. Taking into account parental frustration, this experiment examined anger as a potential cause of the likelihood to engage in spanking in reaction to negative behaviors of a hypothetical 5-year-old child. Participants included 121 college students who experienced an induced mood state while answering questions with regard to likeliness to spank. The results of this study do not allow for a causal statement, but there is evidence of a positive relationship between anger and spanking. Limitations and future research are discussed.

Biography

Emily is a senior psychology major with a minor in business and an emphasis in human resources and personnel. She obtained her associate's degree in sociology from Three Rivers College and transferred to Missouri S& T in 2011. In the fall, she will be attending school to obtain a graduate degree in industrial/organizational psychology. Her research interests include work-life balance, workplace stress, employee attitudes, and motivation. She hopes to work as a consultant after graduate school. Currently, she is research assistant to Dr. Sharpsteen. Emily is also a member of Psi Chi and social chair for PsyCo, the campus psychology organization.

Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Social sciences poster session, First place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 3rd, 1:00 PM Apr 3rd, 3:00 PM

Family Interactions and Mood

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Spanking as a form of discipline is prevalent in the United States, with over 90% of Americans spanking their children. Considering the prevalence of spanking, it has been a topic of study for years. While earlier studies focus primarily on the negative effects of spanking, more recent studies examine the causes of spanking. The frustration-aggression hypothesis proposes that frustration leads to aggressive behavior. Taking into account parental frustration, this experiment examined anger as a potential cause of the likelihood to engage in spanking in reaction to negative behaviors of a hypothetical 5-year-old child. Participants included 121 college students who experienced an induced mood state while answering questions with regard to likeliness to spank. The results of this study do not allow for a causal statement, but there is evidence of a positive relationship between anger and spanking. Limitations and future research are discussed.