Title

Eliminating Extreme Poverty Through Microwork

Presenter Information

Elizabeth Brem

Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Major

Environmental Engineering and Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Oerther, Daniel B.

Advisor's Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Funding Source

John and Susan Mathes Endowed Chair of Environmental Engineering

Abstract

This research is focused on the elimination of extreme poverty utilizing microwork and human computation. The prominent question is: What are ways to promote continuous micro-work in order to eliminate extreme poverty? To answer this question, an understanding of what microwork and human computation means is a necessity and the ability to construct a human computation project is a must. The process of constructing a human computation problem is broken down into a series of smaller steps which can be completed quickly by one, or multiple people, with ease to complete a larger, unified project. The overall goal is to create a steady flow of microwork, that will in turn provide access to a sustainable income to those living in extreme poverty so that they can provide the basic necessities of life to their families and themselves, thus eliminating extreme poverty.

Biography

Elizabeth is an undergraduate student with emphasis in Environmental Engineering. She received her Associates Degree from Southwestern Illinois College in Engineering Sciences. She is currently attending Missouri University of Science and Technology and performing research under Dr. Daniel Oerther.

Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 3rd, 1:00 PM Apr 3rd, 3:00 PM

Eliminating Extreme Poverty Through Microwork

Upper Atrium/Hallway

This research is focused on the elimination of extreme poverty utilizing microwork and human computation. The prominent question is: What are ways to promote continuous micro-work in order to eliminate extreme poverty? To answer this question, an understanding of what microwork and human computation means is a necessity and the ability to construct a human computation project is a must. The process of constructing a human computation problem is broken down into a series of smaller steps which can be completed quickly by one, or multiple people, with ease to complete a larger, unified project. The overall goal is to create a steady flow of microwork, that will in turn provide access to a sustainable income to those living in extreme poverty so that they can provide the basic necessities of life to their families and themselves, thus eliminating extreme poverty.