Title

Geothermal Energy

Presenter Information

John Heatherly

Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Major

Petroleum Engineering

Research Advisor

Nygaard, Runar

Advisor's Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Abstract

In 2010, Missouri University of Science and Technology began an effort to update the methods used to supply energy on campus. The current system uses coal and wood fired boilers to produce steam that provides power through a turbine. These boilers are outdates, have a high operational cost, and offer limited ways to control pollution. A new geothermal systems that provides ground source heat is currently being constructed across campus. The project includes nine well fields, a geothermal loop, ground source heat pump chillers, three local geothermal plants, and an update to the current chilled-water system. Each of these plants and their associated well fields will be responsible for providing energy to select buildings on the Missouri S&T campus. When completed in 2014, the project is expected to cut energy and water use, reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and offer savings in energy and operational costs.

Biography

John Heatherly is currently a third year student at Missouri S& T studying petroleum engineering.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 3rd, 1:00 PM Apr 3rd, 3:00 PM

Geothermal Energy

Upper Atrium/Hallway

In 2010, Missouri University of Science and Technology began an effort to update the methods used to supply energy on campus. The current system uses coal and wood fired boilers to produce steam that provides power through a turbine. These boilers are outdates, have a high operational cost, and offer limited ways to control pollution. A new geothermal systems that provides ground source heat is currently being constructed across campus. The project includes nine well fields, a geothermal loop, ground source heat pump chillers, three local geothermal plants, and an update to the current chilled-water system. Each of these plants and their associated well fields will be responsible for providing energy to select buildings on the Missouri S&T campus. When completed in 2014, the project is expected to cut energy and water use, reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and offer savings in energy and operational costs.