Title

Bond Strengths in Well Design

Presenter Information

Steve Brugere

Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Major

Petroleum Engineering

Research Advisor

Nygaard, Runar

Advisor's Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Funding Source

Missouri S& T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

In drilling operations fluid is used to create hydrostatic pressure to prevent the influx of formation fluids. If the weight of the fluid is too great it can produce a pressure exceeding formation fracture pressure. This will create fractures in the formation and allow fluid migration into the formation or lost circulation. This reduces the hydrostatic head and can lead to a kick or blow out. Cement can be pumped down hole to seal the fractures, but if the fluid's weight is increased this might fracture the seal. Knowing the bond strength between cement and formation can be used to prevent this from occurring. After setting casing and while drilling deeper the process of circulating fluid can create a temperature gradient between the cement and casing which causes a bond stress. If the bond is broken channeling can occur. Knowing the bond strength between cement and steel casing can be used to prevent de-bonding.

Biography

Steve is a senior at Missouri University of Science and Technology and will be graduating in May 2014. He majors in Petroleum Engineering and he is completing his research under the guidance of Dr. Runar Nygaard, instructor of well drilling and casing design and Ben Weideman, a graduate student whose research will incorporate the results from Steve's research. He is the treasurer for S& Ts Society of Petroleum Engineers chapter and is an active member in the petroleum honors society, Pi Epsilon Tau, and the geological honors society, Sigma Gamma Epsilon. Steve has completed a 7 month co-op with Ameren Illinois working in their Gas Storage Department earning him experience with drilling operations, well workovers, and industry networking. Steve is looking forward to his internship this summer working with Kinder Morgan's drilling department in Houston, Texas.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 3rd, 1:00 PM Apr 3rd, 3:00 PM

Bond Strengths in Well Design

Upper Atrium/Hallway

In drilling operations fluid is used to create hydrostatic pressure to prevent the influx of formation fluids. If the weight of the fluid is too great it can produce a pressure exceeding formation fracture pressure. This will create fractures in the formation and allow fluid migration into the formation or lost circulation. This reduces the hydrostatic head and can lead to a kick or blow out. Cement can be pumped down hole to seal the fractures, but if the fluid's weight is increased this might fracture the seal. Knowing the bond strength between cement and formation can be used to prevent this from occurring. After setting casing and while drilling deeper the process of circulating fluid can create a temperature gradient between the cement and casing which causes a bond stress. If the bond is broken channeling can occur. Knowing the bond strength between cement and steel casing can be used to prevent de-bonding.