Title

Attachment of Peptides to Amino-Polystyrene Microspheres

Presenter Information

Derek Schloemann

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Forciniti, Daniel

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Funding Source

Missouri S& T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program; NSF Grant 0933468

Abstract

Peptides consisting of leucine with a lysine tail were attached to amino-polystyrene microspheres. The two applications of this project are the development of a sensor for Alzheimer's disease and the observation of peptide interactions in solution. Attachment was confirmed by FTIR. Light scattering measurements show that the latex aggregated during and after derivatization. The most likely cause for the aggregation was hydrophobic interactions between peptides attached to different beads. A possible solution to this problem is to use an alternate surface, such as a silicon wafer.

Biography

Derek is a senior in biochemical engineering from St. Louis, Missouri. He is a member of the Missouri S& T chapters of American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering, Omega Chi Epsilon Chemical Engineering Honors Society, and Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honors Society.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Engineering oral presentation, Second place

Location

Carver Room

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 11:00 am - 11:30 am

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Apr 3rd, 11:00 AM Apr 3rd, 11:30 AM

Attachment of Peptides to Amino-Polystyrene Microspheres

Carver Room

Peptides consisting of leucine with a lysine tail were attached to amino-polystyrene microspheres. The two applications of this project are the development of a sensor for Alzheimer's disease and the observation of peptide interactions in solution. Attachment was confirmed by FTIR. Light scattering measurements show that the latex aggregated during and after derivatization. The most likely cause for the aggregation was hydrophobic interactions between peptides attached to different beads. A possible solution to this problem is to use an alternate surface, such as a silicon wafer.