Title

Conversion of Rare-Earth Doped Borate Glass to Rare-Earth Phosphate Solid Solution Compounds

Presenter Information

Colin Ryan

Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Major

Ceramic Engineering

Research Advisor

Brow, Richard K.

Advisor's Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Funding Source

National Science Foundation Grants DMR-0305202 and DMR-1207520

Abstract

This study observed and characterized a new method of forming Rare-Earth phosphate (REPO4) compounds using the dissolution of a doped borate glass in a potassium phosphate solution to precipitate X-ray amorphous REPO4·2H2O on what was the surface of the glass. This was then heat treated at 700°C to dehydrate and crystallize into REPO4. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy showed the method's ability to form solid solutions in binary REPO4 systems. Scanning Electron Microscopy showed the formation of hollow spheres of REP04 when using glass microspheres in the dissolution-precipitation process, indicating the ability to control final form through the form of the initial glass. Finally, the fluorescence properties of the (Eu, La)PO4 system was measured, indicating an optimal Eul(Eu+La) of 0.05.

Biography

Colin is a Senior in Ceramic Engineering and has been working with Dr. Brow's research group for 2 years. He is a member of Keramos, Alpha Sigma Mu, Tau Beta Pi, and Tau Beta Sigma. He is graduating in May and plans to pursue a PhD in Material Science, focusing on Glass Science.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Sciences poster session, First place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 3rd, 9:00 AM Apr 3rd, 11:45 AM

Conversion of Rare-Earth Doped Borate Glass to Rare-Earth Phosphate Solid Solution Compounds

Upper Atrium/Hallway

This study observed and characterized a new method of forming Rare-Earth phosphate (REPO4) compounds using the dissolution of a doped borate glass in a potassium phosphate solution to precipitate X-ray amorphous REPO4·2H2O on what was the surface of the glass. This was then heat treated at 700°C to dehydrate and crystallize into REPO4. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy showed the method's ability to form solid solutions in binary REPO4 systems. Scanning Electron Microscopy showed the formation of hollow spheres of REP04 when using glass microspheres in the dissolution-precipitation process, indicating the ability to control final form through the form of the initial glass. Finally, the fluorescence properties of the (Eu, La)PO4 system was measured, indicating an optimal Eul(Eu+La) of 0.05.