Title

Decreased Lipid Metabolism Provides Insight into Sleep Mechanisms

Presenter Information

Carlos Rivera

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Thimgan, Matthew S.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Missouri S& T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program; National Institute of Health

Abstract

Regulation of sleep and wake cycles is critical to maintain consolidated and restorative sleep. We have identified a novel lipid metabolism pathway as a key player in sleep regulation, potentially through energy management. CPT 1 is the protein channel that allows a range of fatty acid chain lengths to enter the first membrane of the mitochondria, then ultimately to undergo Beta-Oxidation and then to oxidative phosphorylation. When levels of Cpt1 are knocked down in the adipose tissue, flies robustly increase wakefulness when presented with starvation conditions, which is not seen in parental controls. We hypothesize that metabolic factors signal the brain to induce wakefulness. We can use this model system to test whether these factors change prior to or during increased wakefulness.

Biography

Carlos is a 22 year old graduating senior in Biological sciences. He has researched with Dr. Thimgan since the beginning of fall semester of 2011.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 3rd, 9:00 AM Apr 3rd, 11:45 AM

Decreased Lipid Metabolism Provides Insight into Sleep Mechanisms

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Regulation of sleep and wake cycles is critical to maintain consolidated and restorative sleep. We have identified a novel lipid metabolism pathway as a key player in sleep regulation, potentially through energy management. CPT 1 is the protein channel that allows a range of fatty acid chain lengths to enter the first membrane of the mitochondria, then ultimately to undergo Beta-Oxidation and then to oxidative phosphorylation. When levels of Cpt1 are knocked down in the adipose tissue, flies robustly increase wakefulness when presented with starvation conditions, which is not seen in parental controls. We hypothesize that metabolic factors signal the brain to induce wakefulness. We can use this model system to test whether these factors change prior to or during increased wakefulness.