Title

Low Energy Electron Diffraction of Thin Chromium Films on a Palladium Crystal

Presenter Information

Andrew Cudd

Department

Physics

Major

Physics/Computer Engineering

Research Advisor

Waddill, George Daniel
Story, J. Greg

Funding Source

Physics

Abstract

The surface-surface interactions between a sample of palladium and a thin film of chromium grown on the surface were studied using Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The combination of the thin film and the properties of LEED allowed for close study of interaction of the chromium atoms on the surface of the palladium without penetrating into the palladium bulk. The geometric arrangement of the atoms and lattice that the chromium created as it bonded to the palladium was of great interest. The exact arrangement of the atoms as they attempt to fit together can be used to predict the properties of the interactions, along with the differences between thin and thick films of material, leading to new uses of the material.

Biography

Andrew is a junior that is dual majoring in Physics and Computer Engineering.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

03 Apr 2013, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 3rd, 9:00 AM Apr 3rd, 11:45 AM

Low Energy Electron Diffraction of Thin Chromium Films on a Palladium Crystal

Upper Atrium/Hallway

The surface-surface interactions between a sample of palladium and a thin film of chromium grown on the surface were studied using Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The combination of the thin film and the properties of LEED allowed for close study of interaction of the chromium atoms on the surface of the palladium without penetrating into the palladium bulk. The geometric arrangement of the atoms and lattice that the chromium created as it bonded to the palladium was of great interest. The exact arrangement of the atoms as they attempt to fit together can be used to predict the properties of the interactions, along with the differences between thin and thick films of material, leading to new uses of the material.