Title

Developing a Platform-Independent Server for the Virtual Facilitator Project

Presenter Information

Margret Steele

Department

Computer Science

Major

Computer Science

Research Advisor

Tauritz, Daniel R.

Advisor's Department

Computer Science

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

While human expert group facilitators are known to significantly improve work flow, they are scarce and prohibitively expensive. The Virtual Facilitator (VF) project mediates the communications between multiple parties instead of a human facilitator. Over time, VF has grown in size and complexity. The project has outgrown its experimental roots on a custom platform. Platform independence is desirable because it improves manageability and portability in order to adapt to fast-changing technologies. It is important to maintain a system capable of handling cutting-edge research requirements. VF has migrated to a robust server architecture, minimizing ties to any particular host architecture. This effort has ensured the continued development and longevity of the VF project.

Biography

Margret plans to graduate in 2013 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science from Missouri University of Science and Technology. She graduated in 2010 from Northwest Missouri State University with an Associates degree of Science and Mathematics. She is currently working on the Virtual Facilitator project in S&T’s Natural Computation Laboratory. Over the next few years, she plans to pursue research in software engineering at Missouri S&T.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

10 Apr 2012, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 10th, 9:00 AM Apr 10th, 11:45 AM

Developing a Platform-Independent Server for the Virtual Facilitator Project

Upper Atrium/Hallway

While human expert group facilitators are known to significantly improve work flow, they are scarce and prohibitively expensive. The Virtual Facilitator (VF) project mediates the communications between multiple parties instead of a human facilitator. Over time, VF has grown in size and complexity. The project has outgrown its experimental roots on a custom platform. Platform independence is desirable because it improves manageability and portability in order to adapt to fast-changing technologies. It is important to maintain a system capable of handling cutting-edge research requirements. VF has migrated to a robust server architecture, minimizing ties to any particular host architecture. This effort has ensured the continued development and longevity of the VF project.