Title

Biotechnological Use of Bacteriorhodopsin as Memory Storage

Presenter Information

Brandon Boies

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.
Mormile, Melanie R.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

Rhodopsins are pigment proteins in retinal tissues that make up photoreceptive cells. Various forms of rhodopsins, such as bacteriorhodopsin, which acts as a proton pump in many halophilic Archaea, channel-rhodopsin, and halorhodopsin can be used to create a binary system capable of storing data as temporary and longterm memory. When illuminated with various wavelengths of light, bacteriorhodopsin undergoes a conformational change from ground state to excited state.

Bacteriorhodopsin can be cultivated industrially from Archaea such as Halobacterium salinarum and bacteria such as Escherichia coli. It can effectively be extracted via dialysis and centrifugation. Alternating wavelengths of light can be used to induce an excited state (M state, 460nm) from its ground state (B state, 500-650nm), establishing a functional binary system.

The exploration of a biological memory system would ease the global dependence on silicon based memory systems and devices.

Biography

Brandon is a graduating senior at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. He joined the Biological Sciences department as a freshman in August 2008. Brandon has been involved in several research projects, including analyzing gene families of Glycine max and characterizing the halophile, Halorubrum salsolis.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

10 Apr 2012, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 10th, 9:00 AM Apr 10th, 11:45 AM

Biotechnological Use of Bacteriorhodopsin as Memory Storage

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Rhodopsins are pigment proteins in retinal tissues that make up photoreceptive cells. Various forms of rhodopsins, such as bacteriorhodopsin, which acts as a proton pump in many halophilic Archaea, channel-rhodopsin, and halorhodopsin can be used to create a binary system capable of storing data as temporary and longterm memory. When illuminated with various wavelengths of light, bacteriorhodopsin undergoes a conformational change from ground state to excited state.

Bacteriorhodopsin can be cultivated industrially from Archaea such as Halobacterium salinarum and bacteria such as Escherichia coli. It can effectively be extracted via dialysis and centrifugation. Alternating wavelengths of light can be used to induce an excited state (M state, 460nm) from its ground state (B state, 500-650nm), establishing a functional binary system.

The exploration of a biological memory system would ease the global dependence on silicon based memory systems and devices.