Title

Fab@Home

Presenter Information

Tyler Thompson

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Mechanical Engineering

Research Advisor

Leu, M. C. (Ming-Chuan)

Advisor's Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Funding Source

National Science Foundation

Abstract

The intended goal of the Fab@Home was to offer hobbyists with a way to make custom items that would satisfy their own personal interests through three dimensional printing. The three dimensional printing the Fab@Home is outputting is called Solid freeform fabrication (SFF). The Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) has the capability of transforming and modernizing manufacturing, because it allows individuals to invent and customize goods in their own homes. Even though commercial fabrication systems are successful, they are very costly. Our research goal is to use the Fab@Home machine to experiment with using two different materials to fabricate parts.

Biography

Tyler is a senior in Mechanical Engineering. He was a member of the Chancellor’s Leadership Academy and is currently a member of Pi Tau Sigma. Tyler was accepted on a co-op with The Boeing Company is St. Louis MO Spring Semester 2009, and has been on summer internships ever since. Tyler will be graduating next semester fall 2011.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

06 Apr 2011, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Comments

Joint project with Julie Ezzell

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Apr 6th, 1:00 PM Apr 6th, 3:00 PM

Fab@Home

Upper Atrium/Hallway

The intended goal of the Fab@Home was to offer hobbyists with a way to make custom items that would satisfy their own personal interests through three dimensional printing. The three dimensional printing the Fab@Home is outputting is called Solid freeform fabrication (SFF). The Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) has the capability of transforming and modernizing manufacturing, because it allows individuals to invent and customize goods in their own homes. Even though commercial fabrication systems are successful, they are very costly. Our research goal is to use the Fab@Home machine to experiment with using two different materials to fabricate parts.