Title

Electromagnetic Wavefront Shaping

Presenter Information

Laura Sisken

Department

Physics

Major

Physics

Research Advisor

Yamilov, Alexey

Advisor's Department

Physics

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

It is well known that electromagnetic waves can be superimposed and thus create interference effects. By applying this fact one can focus light by superimposing a specific combination of electromagnetic wave fronts. Using numerical simulations, I demonstrated a possibility of such focusing through a random medium. These simulations were done in COMSOL Multiphysics in conjunction with Matlab to launch certain combinations of plane waves through a substrate with metallic scatterers placed on top of it. I have shown that one can focus light in a specific place, and by tuning the phases of the waves one can translate the focused light across the sample. One application for this setup is scanning biological molecules that are attached to metallic nanoparticles without using moving parts.

Biography

Laura is currently a junior in Physics. She is involved in the Society of Physics Students, the MSM Spelunkers and Christian Campus Fellowship.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

06 Apr 2011, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 6th, 9:00 AM Apr 6th, 11:45 AM

Electromagnetic Wavefront Shaping

Upper Atrium/Hallway

It is well known that electromagnetic waves can be superimposed and thus create interference effects. By applying this fact one can focus light by superimposing a specific combination of electromagnetic wave fronts. Using numerical simulations, I demonstrated a possibility of such focusing through a random medium. These simulations were done in COMSOL Multiphysics in conjunction with Matlab to launch certain combinations of plane waves through a substrate with metallic scatterers placed on top of it. I have shown that one can focus light in a specific place, and by tuning the phases of the waves one can translate the focused light across the sample. One application for this setup is scanning biological molecules that are attached to metallic nanoparticles without using moving parts.