Title

Assessment of Fungal Diversity in an Acidic Lake through Use of Traditional and Molecular Techniques

Presenter Information

Amber Kreps

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Niyogi, Dev

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program; Freshwater Ecology Lab

Abstract

In this project I compared traditional and molecular approaches to assess diversity of aquatic fungi in an acidic lake. Leaves were deployed for colonization at four sites in Finger Lake State Park, located near Columbia, Missouri. The land once housed a coal mine, and one small lake, “Red Lake,” remains acidic. Sites included an extremely acidic seep (pH 3), a site in Red Lake (pH 3.5), a site downstream from Red Lake (pH 3.5), and a nearby neutral lake (pH 7). For the traditional approach, I examined fungal spores microscopically, and grew fungi from leaves in an attempt to isolate pure cultures. For the molecular approach, DGGE analysis was done using DNA extracted and amplified from leaves and pure cultures grown in the lab. Traditional and molecular analyses yielded different results, due in part to biases in the traditional methods. Based on the molecular analysis, diversity decreased as acidity increased.

Biography

Amber is a junior in the Biology department. She participates in undergraduate research in the Freshwater Ecology Lab and is a work study student for the Microbiology Lab. Amber is a member of Phi Sigma and the iGEM design team.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

06 Apr 2011, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 6th, 9:00 AM Apr 6th, 11:45 AM

Assessment of Fungal Diversity in an Acidic Lake through Use of Traditional and Molecular Techniques

Upper Atrium/Hallway

In this project I compared traditional and molecular approaches to assess diversity of aquatic fungi in an acidic lake. Leaves were deployed for colonization at four sites in Finger Lake State Park, located near Columbia, Missouri. The land once housed a coal mine, and one small lake, “Red Lake,” remains acidic. Sites included an extremely acidic seep (pH 3), a site in Red Lake (pH 3.5), a site downstream from Red Lake (pH 3.5), and a nearby neutral lake (pH 7). For the traditional approach, I examined fungal spores microscopically, and grew fungi from leaves in an attempt to isolate pure cultures. For the molecular approach, DGGE analysis was done using DNA extracted and amplified from leaves and pure cultures grown in the lab. Traditional and molecular analyses yielded different results, due in part to biases in the traditional methods. Based on the molecular analysis, diversity decreased as acidity increased.