Title

A Study of the Historical Interpretations of the Emancipation Proclamation

Presenter Information

Kyle Visnapuu

Department

History and Political Science

Major

History and Political Science

Research Advisor

DeWitt, Petra, 1961-

Advisor's Department

History and Political Science

Abstract

This paper attempts to study the historical interpretations and perspectives of the Emancipation Proclamation, mainly through secondary sources, and to find a unifying theme throughout sources that differ over the reasons for the proclamation’s issuance; the paper, in addition, attempts to account for these differences. The numerous sources used span from the issuance of the document in 1863 to the twenty-first century, and take the form of newspaper and magazine articles, journal essays, and books. Moreover, a deliberate attempt was made when researching for this paper to include authors with wide differences of opinion regarding the reasons for issuing the proclamation.

Biography

Kyle has been a part-time student majoring in history at the Missouri University of Science and Technology since fall 2007. He enjoys American History, specifically the social and political history of the Civil War era, including the study and impact of the Emancipation Proclamation on the war and American History. In addition to enjoying history, Kyle has also enjoyed his writing and literature courses.

Research Category

Arts and Humanities

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Turner Room

Presentation Date

06 Apr 2011, 3:00 pm - 3:30 pm

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Apr 6th, 3:00 PM Apr 6th, 3:30 PM

A Study of the Historical Interpretations of the Emancipation Proclamation

Turner Room

This paper attempts to study the historical interpretations and perspectives of the Emancipation Proclamation, mainly through secondary sources, and to find a unifying theme throughout sources that differ over the reasons for the proclamation’s issuance; the paper, in addition, attempts to account for these differences. The numerous sources used span from the issuance of the document in 1863 to the twenty-first century, and take the form of newspaper and magazine articles, journal essays, and books. Moreover, a deliberate attempt was made when researching for this paper to include authors with wide differences of opinion regarding the reasons for issuing the proclamation.