Title

When Nature is Not Enough: Frederick Douglass’ Desire to Enter Human Society in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave

Presenter Information

Samantha Lucker

Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Major

Geophysics

Research Advisor

Johnson, Lindgren H.

Advisor's Department

English and Technical Communication

Abstract

Recently many literary scholars, such as Jeffery Myers, have been researching the connection between slaves and nature in slave narratives. Scholars claim that there is a liberating quality in nature that provided comfort to African American slaves. What they fail to realize it the concept that the connection does not have to be a positive one. This report examines Frederick Douglass’ narrative and other secondary sources to prove that this connection exists as a negative correlation and how Douglass managed to free himself from it.

Biography

Samantha is currently a freshman majoring in Geophysics. In addition to English research, she is involved in numerous campus activities and organizations such as treasurer of the C.L. Dake Society, member of SEG, and member of the Missouri S&T fencing club. She plans to graduate in the spring semester of 2014 and continue on to graduate school.

Research Category

Arts and Humanities

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Arts and humanities oral presentation, Second place

Location

Turner Room

Presentation Date

06 Apr 2011, 1:30 pm - 2:00 pm

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Apr 6th, 1:30 PM Apr 6th, 2:00 PM

When Nature is Not Enough: Frederick Douglass’ Desire to Enter Human Society in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave

Turner Room

Recently many literary scholars, such as Jeffery Myers, have been researching the connection between slaves and nature in slave narratives. Scholars claim that there is a liberating quality in nature that provided comfort to African American slaves. What they fail to realize it the concept that the connection does not have to be a positive one. This report examines Frederick Douglass’ narrative and other secondary sources to prove that this connection exists as a negative correlation and how Douglass managed to free himself from it.