Title

Dynamic Contact Angles of Crude Oil

Presenter Information

Kyle Buchheit

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Neogi, P. (Partho), 1951-

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

A Cahn dynamic contact angle device was used to measure the dynamic contact angles of crude oil. This is done by pulling a plate through a liquid-air interface at a constant velocity. The equipment measures the change in force as the plate leaves the interface, and this force is related to the dynamic contact angle. These angles, going up to entrainment where possible, will be measured against varying plate velocities. Alongside, viscosities, surface and interfacial tensions will be measured. The results will be checked against existing correlations. The data are expected to be of use in crude oil recovery. The Question being addressed is what is the limiting velocity for contact angles that could be used in determining the rate at which crude oil could be recovered from porous material.

Biography

Kyle Buchheit was born and raised in Old Appleton, Missouri. He attended the rural high school at Oak Ridge and was valedictorian of his graduating class. Kyle is currently a senior at the Missouri University of Science and Technology pursuing a B.S. in Chemical Engineering and a B.A. in Economics. After graduation, Kyle plans on remaining at Missouri S&T to work towards a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

07 Apr 2010, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 7th, 1:00 PM Apr 7th, 3:00 PM

Dynamic Contact Angles of Crude Oil

Upper Atrium/Hallway

A Cahn dynamic contact angle device was used to measure the dynamic contact angles of crude oil. This is done by pulling a plate through a liquid-air interface at a constant velocity. The equipment measures the change in force as the plate leaves the interface, and this force is related to the dynamic contact angle. These angles, going up to entrainment where possible, will be measured against varying plate velocities. Alongside, viscosities, surface and interfacial tensions will be measured. The results will be checked against existing correlations. The data are expected to be of use in crude oil recovery. The Question being addressed is what is the limiting velocity for contact angles that could be used in determining the rate at which crude oil could be recovered from porous material.