Title

Process Modeling for Dip Pen Nanolithography

Presenter Information

Emily Briggs

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Mechanical Engineering

Research Advisor

Bristow, Douglas A.

Advisor's Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Abstract

Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPN) is 2-D nanoscale printing process. In DPN, an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) probe is dipped into a specially formulated ink and then moved across a substrate to print the desired pattern. Although this process is commonly applied in research, the focus is on developing inks, not manufacturing. As such, the sophisticated transport models that have been developed do not translate easily to process planning and predicting product quality. This work develops a basic process modeling framework and process models for 16-Mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHA). Samples of lines and dots are printed at varying speeds, pause times, and patterns. In addition to the process modeling, the printed patterns also reveal characteristics of the AFM such as hysteresis, that are as critical as the process model in obtaining desired patterns. The models developed in this work are the first steps toward process planning and control for high quality DPN.

Biography

Emily Briggs is currently a Mechanical Engineering junior who is an active member and officer of the Missouri S&T Robotics Competition Team for the past three years. Emily is also plays in the University and Community Symphony Orchestra.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

07 Apr 2010, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 7th, 1:00 PM Apr 7th, 3:00 PM

Process Modeling for Dip Pen Nanolithography

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPN) is 2-D nanoscale printing process. In DPN, an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) probe is dipped into a specially formulated ink and then moved across a substrate to print the desired pattern. Although this process is commonly applied in research, the focus is on developing inks, not manufacturing. As such, the sophisticated transport models that have been developed do not translate easily to process planning and predicting product quality. This work develops a basic process modeling framework and process models for 16-Mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHA). Samples of lines and dots are printed at varying speeds, pause times, and patterns. In addition to the process modeling, the printed patterns also reveal characteristics of the AFM such as hysteresis, that are as critical as the process model in obtaining desired patterns. The models developed in this work are the first steps toward process planning and control for high quality DPN.