Title

Phosphorus Dynamics in an Ozark Stream and a Hyper-eutrophic Lake in East Central Missouri

Presenter Information

Drew Menke

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biology

Research Advisor

Niyogi, Dev

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program; Freshwater Ecology Lab

Abstract

I compared phosphorus dynamics in 2 different aquatic systems: Mill Creek, a mesotrophic stream in Missouri’s, south-central Ozarks, and a small, six acre hypereutrophic lake in east central Missouri. It was hypothesized that the greatest factors influencing phosphorus levels in Mill Creek were rainfall events during the sampling year of 2009. I measured a significant increase in both total phosphorus (TP), and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) phosphorous levels during rain events. This correlation between rain flow and mobile phosphorous within Mill Creek can be seen across the year. In the lake, I hypothesized that the distribution of phosphorus is not uniform, and that the main contributor to the varying distribution is rainfall. The data supports this hypothesis in that it presents itself as two distinctly different distribution curves. Furthermore the major form of phosphorus within the lake system is organic matter with only 5% of TP as SRP.

Biography

Drew Menke is a senior in the Biological Sciences department and will be graduating this May with a BS in Biology and a minor in Chemistry. His education will continue this summer, as he attends the University of Missouri as a graduate student, in their biochemistry department.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Sciences poster session, Third place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

07 Apr 2010, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 7th, 9:00 AM Apr 7th, 11:45 AM

Phosphorus Dynamics in an Ozark Stream and a Hyper-eutrophic Lake in East Central Missouri

Upper Atrium/Hallway

I compared phosphorus dynamics in 2 different aquatic systems: Mill Creek, a mesotrophic stream in Missouri’s, south-central Ozarks, and a small, six acre hypereutrophic lake in east central Missouri. It was hypothesized that the greatest factors influencing phosphorus levels in Mill Creek were rainfall events during the sampling year of 2009. I measured a significant increase in both total phosphorus (TP), and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) phosphorous levels during rain events. This correlation between rain flow and mobile phosphorous within Mill Creek can be seen across the year. In the lake, I hypothesized that the distribution of phosphorus is not uniform, and that the main contributor to the varying distribution is rainfall. The data supports this hypothesis in that it presents itself as two distinctly different distribution curves. Furthermore the major form of phosphorus within the lake system is organic matter with only 5% of TP as SRP.