Title

Like, What’s the Deal With Like?

Presenter Information

Amanda Amsden

Department

English and Technical Communication

Major

English

Research Advisor

Bryan, Eric Shane

Advisor's Department

English and Technical Communication

Abstract

This project investigates word like as it used in Modern English, focusing on like as a quotative, discourse filler and hedge. Data was gathered by recording conversations between players of the video game World of Warcraft and afterward analyzed. When players used the word like in conversation the usage was placed into the following categories: preposition used in comparisons, a conjunction, a verb, a noun, an adverb, a quotatative, a hedge or a discourse particle. This research demonstrates why like should be appreciated in Modern English for its versatility and use as a discourse particle.

Biography

Amanda Amsden is currently a senior majoring in English with secondary teaching certification at the University of Missouri Science and Technology. After graduating May, she plans to teach English at a secondary school in the area while working on a master’s degree in educational literacy. Amanda’s hobbies include reading, riding fourwheelers and spending time with her dog and two cats.

Research Category

Arts and Humanities

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Arts and humanities oral presentation, Second place

Location

Carver Room

Presentation Date

07 Apr 2010, 2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

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Apr 7th, 2:00 PM Apr 7th, 2:30 PM

Like, What’s the Deal With Like?

Carver Room

This project investigates word like as it used in Modern English, focusing on like as a quotative, discourse filler and hedge. Data was gathered by recording conversations between players of the video game World of Warcraft and afterward analyzed. When players used the word like in conversation the usage was placed into the following categories: preposition used in comparisons, a conjunction, a verb, a noun, an adverb, a quotatative, a hedge or a discourse particle. This research demonstrates why like should be appreciated in Modern English for its versatility and use as a discourse particle.