Title

Project title: Isolation and Identification of Potential PCB Degrading Microorganisms

Presenter Information

Richard Campos

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

Biodegradation is an attractive option for the remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) because it can lead to the complete destruction of a PCB. The samples of microorganisms we have worked with have possessed the potential to be PCB degraders based on the results of the growth on biphenyl. Once we are able to obtain permission to work with PCB and we can grow the samples directly on the PCB to conclusively determine if the samples in question contain the necessary gene to degrade PCBs. After using PCBs for so long it has been clear that the compound poses a threat to both the environment and to humans.

Biography

Richard Campos is a senior in the Biological Sciences Department. He wishes to eventually go to dental school, but is first going to receive his masters in Cellular and Molecular Biology at UMCK. He has been involved his department having been the president Phi Sigma the Biological Sciences honor’s society during which time he started a scholarship for a deserving freshman in the department. He has also been involved on campus having held several positions on student council and is currently the City Council Representative for Missouri S&T’s student council.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Carver Room

Presentation Date

07 Apr 2010, 9:00 am - 9:30 am

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Apr 7th, 9:00 AM Apr 7th, 9:30 AM

Project title: Isolation and Identification of Potential PCB Degrading Microorganisms

Carver Room

Biodegradation is an attractive option for the remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) because it can lead to the complete destruction of a PCB. The samples of microorganisms we have worked with have possessed the potential to be PCB degraders based on the results of the growth on biphenyl. Once we are able to obtain permission to work with PCB and we can grow the samples directly on the PCB to conclusively determine if the samples in question contain the necessary gene to degrade PCBs. After using PCBs for so long it has been clear that the compound poses a threat to both the environment and to humans.