Title

A Synthetic Biology Approach to Microbial Fuel Cell Development

Presenter Information

Patrick VerSteeg

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Shannon, Katie
Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

Optimization of electron shuffle to external surfaces such as anodes was a primary goal. Geobacter sulfurreducens happened to be our model bacteria due to its ability in nature to efficiently export electrons extracelluarly. E. coli was the chassis for this experiment due to its genome already containing some key proteins in our preferred pathway. The proteins, such as extracellular pilin, MacA, and many other cytochromes, which E. coli does not have were isolated from Geobacter sulfurreducens and introduced into E. coli to formulate the most optimal pathway for generating electronmotive force in a microbial fuel cell apparatus.

Some problems were faced concerning plasmid engineering and the simple fact that Geobacter is anaerobic and E. coli is aerobic. The current work includes production and optimization of a microbial fuel cell into which our modified bacteria will be placed.

Biography

Patrick VerSteeg is currently a junior in the Chemical and Biological Engineering department. While at the university he has assisted in founding and held office in multiple campus organization and been inducted into the Phi Eta Sigma and Phi Sigma honor societies.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

08 Apr 2009, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

Comments

Joint project with Michelle Brosnahan and Marcus Hayer

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Apr 8th, 9:00 AM Apr 8th, 11:45 AM

A Synthetic Biology Approach to Microbial Fuel Cell Development

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Optimization of electron shuffle to external surfaces such as anodes was a primary goal. Geobacter sulfurreducens happened to be our model bacteria due to its ability in nature to efficiently export electrons extracelluarly. E. coli was the chassis for this experiment due to its genome already containing some key proteins in our preferred pathway. The proteins, such as extracellular pilin, MacA, and many other cytochromes, which E. coli does not have were isolated from Geobacter sulfurreducens and introduced into E. coli to formulate the most optimal pathway for generating electronmotive force in a microbial fuel cell apparatus.

Some problems were faced concerning plasmid engineering and the simple fact that Geobacter is anaerobic and E. coli is aerobic. The current work includes production and optimization of a microbial fuel cell into which our modified bacteria will be placed.