Title

Experimental Module Creation for Forensic Engineering Education

Presenter Information

Ryan Arlitt

Major

Interdisciplinary Engineering

Research Advisor

Grantham Lough, Katie, 1979-

Advisor's Department

Engineering Management and Systems Engineering

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

Experimental modules were researched and created for use in a future Applied Design of Experiments course in the Interdisciplinary Engineering Department's developing Forensic Engineering Track. Five modules were pursued, with three showing promise for use in a lecture/laboratory course. An experimental module testing cricket chirping rate as a predictor of temperature was developed, tested, and shows promise. A module for detecting residue on currency was pursued and discovered to exist in classroom-ready form at another university. Creation of a module for testing the feasibility and properties of an ice projectile was deemed unfeasible for this application in the face of cost and safety issues. A preexisting module involving solar panels was tested and refined, and a newly created earthquake engineering module succeeded in a middle school setting but fell short of suitability for college use.

Biography

Ryan Arlitt is a senior in the Interdisciplinary Engineering department. He is the son of Michael and Christine Arlitt from Houston, Texas. This is his second foray into research, with the first being population and analysis of the Design Repository. His future plans include the pursuit of a master's degree in Systems Engineering.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Ozark Room

Presentation Date

08 Apr 2009, 10:30 am - 11:00 am

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Apr 8th, 10:30 AM Apr 8th, 11:00 AM

Experimental Module Creation for Forensic Engineering Education

Ozark Room

Experimental modules were researched and created for use in a future Applied Design of Experiments course in the Interdisciplinary Engineering Department's developing Forensic Engineering Track. Five modules were pursued, with three showing promise for use in a lecture/laboratory course. An experimental module testing cricket chirping rate as a predictor of temperature was developed, tested, and shows promise. A module for detecting residue on currency was pursued and discovered to exist in classroom-ready form at another university. Creation of a module for testing the feasibility and properties of an ice projectile was deemed unfeasible for this application in the face of cost and safety issues. A preexisting module involving solar panels was tested and refined, and a newly created earthquake engineering module succeeded in a middle school setting but fell short of suitability for college use.