Title

Quantum Dot Photolithography

Presenter Information

Lane A. Martin

Department

Physics

Major

Physics

Research Advisor

Bertino, Massimo F.

Advisor's Department

Physics

Funding Source

Missouri Research Board, Department of Energy

Abstract

Porous silica matricies were patterned with CdS quantum dots via x-ray, ultraviolet radiation, and infra red photolithography, as well as multiphoton ionization. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanoparticles that are small enough to enter the quantum confinement regime, and show unique optical properties. The CdS quantum dots were characterized with Raman, absorption and emission spectroscopies, and transmission electron microscopy. These techniques confirmed the identity of the nanoparticles and showed evidence of quantum confinement effects. The techniques used to pattern quantum dots have never been done before, and may serve to bring quantum dot technology into mainstream industry.

Biography

Lane Martin is a sophmore physics major at the University of Missouri--Rolla. He is from Rogersville MO and is the son of Larry and Meredith Martin. He has been working as a research assistant with Dr. Bertino, professor of physics, for two years. Outside of class, he enjoys wake boarding, sudoku, good music, and working with kids. He is an active member of the Christian Campus Fellowship. After undergraduate studies at UMR, he hopes to pursue further education in the fields of optics or solid state physics, then move onto a national laboratory or a teaching position at a university.

Research Category

Natural Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Natural Sciences oral presentation, Second place

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 10:30 am

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Apr 12th, 10:30 AM

Quantum Dot Photolithography

Porous silica matricies were patterned with CdS quantum dots via x-ray, ultraviolet radiation, and infra red photolithography, as well as multiphoton ionization. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanoparticles that are small enough to enter the quantum confinement regime, and show unique optical properties. The CdS quantum dots were characterized with Raman, absorption and emission spectroscopies, and transmission electron microscopy. These techniques confirmed the identity of the nanoparticles and showed evidence of quantum confinement effects. The techniques used to pattern quantum dots have never been done before, and may serve to bring quantum dot technology into mainstream industry.