Title

Development of Portable Biosensor for Quantitative analysis of Tumor-Liberated Proteins in Human Serum

Presenter Information

Chrstopher Campbell

Department

Chemistry

Research Advisor

Ma, Yinfa

Advisor's Department

Chemistry

Abstract

The need for a quick, accurate and cost-effective method of determining the presence or stage of a tumor in a patient has led researchers to seek a new breed of instruments capable of meeting this demand. These instruments, commonly known as biosensors, are capable of detecting minute quantities of a selected proteomic target in solution or via any alternative method that allows uniform distribution of the proteomic target across the entire medium. One alternative method employed in this project involves the adsorption of the protein to a gold surface for measurement using fluorescent probes.

The project for this year was divided into two segments: research of previous projects similar in concept and design, as well as TLPs specific to non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) as potential targets for future study, and creation of the biosensor with preliminary testing.

Results suggest the use of a cytokeratin fragment, Cyfra 21-1, as a biomarker for monitoring the progress of tumor progression once diagnosis has been made. The biosensor also seems to show great promise for more studies involving similar methods.

Biography

Christopher Thomas Campbell is a sophomore attending the University of Missouri - Rolla to study biochemistry. He is the first son of Steven and Kimberly Campbell, who reside in Nixa, Missouri with his two younger brothers, Brian and Michael.

Research Category

Natural Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Natural Sciences oral presentation, Thirid place

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 9:00 am

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 9:00 AM

Development of Portable Biosensor for Quantitative analysis of Tumor-Liberated Proteins in Human Serum

The need for a quick, accurate and cost-effective method of determining the presence or stage of a tumor in a patient has led researchers to seek a new breed of instruments capable of meeting this demand. These instruments, commonly known as biosensors, are capable of detecting minute quantities of a selected proteomic target in solution or via any alternative method that allows uniform distribution of the proteomic target across the entire medium. One alternative method employed in this project involves the adsorption of the protein to a gold surface for measurement using fluorescent probes.

The project for this year was divided into two segments: research of previous projects similar in concept and design, as well as TLPs specific to non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) as potential targets for future study, and creation of the biosensor with preliminary testing.

Results suggest the use of a cytokeratin fragment, Cyfra 21-1, as a biomarker for monitoring the progress of tumor progression once diagnosis has been made. The biosensor also seems to show great promise for more studies involving similar methods.