Title

The Millerite Movement: A Sign of the Times

Presenter Information

Mary Peaslee

Department

History and Political Science

Major

History, with Education Certification

Research Advisor

Ahmad, Diana L., 1953-

Advisor's Department

History and Political Science

Abstract

As the second quarter of the nineteenth century progressed, significant changes took place in American life. The young nation experienced industrialization, population growth and evangelistic revivalism, all contributing to a sense of volatility and apprehension. Jacksonian politics encouraged citizen participation and offered new opportunities for the common man in areas that were formerly inaccessible, including lay preaching. As the reluctant founder of the Millerite movement, William Miller convinced thousands that Jesus Christ would return to the earth in the 1840s through his significant Scriptural studies and mathematical calculations. The movement grew out of the reforms, millennial revivalism and citizen involvement that Americans experienced during the 1830s and 40s, demonstrating its greatest effect in the New England area. The movement proved short-lived, with its only lasting legacy being the Seventh Day Adventist Church.

Biography

Mary Peaslee is a senior attending the University of Missouri--Rolla, majoring in history with education certification. Upon graduation in December 2006, she plans on teaching history at the secondary level.

Research Category

Humanities/Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Humanities/Social Sciences oral presentation, Second place

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 10:00 am

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Apr 12th, 10:00 AM

The Millerite Movement: A Sign of the Times

As the second quarter of the nineteenth century progressed, significant changes took place in American life. The young nation experienced industrialization, population growth and evangelistic revivalism, all contributing to a sense of volatility and apprehension. Jacksonian politics encouraged citizen participation and offered new opportunities for the common man in areas that were formerly inaccessible, including lay preaching. As the reluctant founder of the Millerite movement, William Miller convinced thousands that Jesus Christ would return to the earth in the 1840s through his significant Scriptural studies and mathematical calculations. The movement grew out of the reforms, millennial revivalism and citizen involvement that Americans experienced during the 1830s and 40s, demonstrating its greatest effect in the New England area. The movement proved short-lived, with its only lasting legacy being the Seventh Day Adventist Church.