Title

Effects of Microgravity on Bone Tissue Scaffolds for In Vitro Tissue Growth

Presenter Information

Darla L. Ellis

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Brown, Roger F.
Collier, Harvest L.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Second Advisor's Department

Chemistry

Funding Source

Missouri Alliance for Minority Participation

Abstract

Synthetic bone tissue is an emerging technological interest. Many aspects must be accounted for to have a viable product, to include three-dimensional scaffold constructs, development of extracellular matrices, smooth collagen surfaces, and effects of pressure within and outside of the body. The ideal scaffold encourages differentiation of bone tissues without inducing undue trauma to the tissues. The application of the microgravity concept would be employed to keep stresses to a minimum. Microgravity will be simulated using a rotating-wall vessel, which has its vertical axis parallel to gravity. The centrifugal forces produced by the rotating motion provide a near normal gravity environment. The study proposes to determine the effects microgravity has on cell-cell adhesion.

Biography

Darla is a senior majoring in Chemical Engineering. She is employed part-time at the JCPenney hair salon as a stylist. Darla plans to pursue a career in plastics engineering upon graduation. Some of her hobbies include poetry and dancing.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Research Proposals, First place

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 9:00 am

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM

Effects of Microgravity on Bone Tissue Scaffolds for In Vitro Tissue Growth

Synthetic bone tissue is an emerging technological interest. Many aspects must be accounted for to have a viable product, to include three-dimensional scaffold constructs, development of extracellular matrices, smooth collagen surfaces, and effects of pressure within and outside of the body. The ideal scaffold encourages differentiation of bone tissues without inducing undue trauma to the tissues. The application of the microgravity concept would be employed to keep stresses to a minimum. Microgravity will be simulated using a rotating-wall vessel, which has its vertical axis parallel to gravity. The centrifugal forces produced by the rotating motion provide a near normal gravity environment. The study proposes to determine the effects microgravity has on cell-cell adhesion.