Title

The friends of Barbados; an analysis of Quakers living on the island of Barbados in the late 17th Century

Presenter Information

James Ney McDonald

Department

History and Political Science

Major

History

Research Advisor

Gragg, Larry Dale, 1950-

Advisor's Department

History and Political Science

Funding Source

UMR Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE), UMR History Department

Abstract

In an analytical review of research into the nature of free white Quakers living on the island of Barbados in the late 1600s, the author interprets information provided by his advisor, Dr. Larry Gragg, and compares the results to the work of Richard S. Dunn, in order to arrive at a more accurate description of the people who made up this small group. Sources used include Dr. Gragg’s research of primary sources such as census records from 1680 and research done by Dunn for his book Sugar and Slaves (1972). The author supports the conclusion shared by Gragg and Dunn that the Quaker movement held universal appeal for the free white populous of Barbados, and that its members came from a diversity of backgrounds. The author adds that review of data from the 1680 census suggests that the Quakers were on average slightly better off than most free Barbadians.

Biography

James is a senior attending the University of Missouri--Rolla majoring in History. He is the son of Donald and Rebecca McDonald, and is originally from Jefferson City, Missouri.

Research Category

Humanities/Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Humanities/Social Sciences poster session, Third place

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 1:00 pm

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 1:00 PM

The friends of Barbados; an analysis of Quakers living on the island of Barbados in the late 17th Century

In an analytical review of research into the nature of free white Quakers living on the island of Barbados in the late 1600s, the author interprets information provided by his advisor, Dr. Larry Gragg, and compares the results to the work of Richard S. Dunn, in order to arrive at a more accurate description of the people who made up this small group. Sources used include Dr. Gragg’s research of primary sources such as census records from 1680 and research done by Dunn for his book Sugar and Slaves (1972). The author supports the conclusion shared by Gragg and Dunn that the Quaker movement held universal appeal for the free white populous of Barbados, and that its members came from a diversity of backgrounds. The author adds that review of data from the 1680 census suggests that the Quakers were on average slightly better off than most free Barbadians.