Title

Robotic Prosthetic Arm

Presenter Information

Robert Duke Adams

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Mechanical Engineering

Research Advisor

Stanek, Keith

Advisor's Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Funding Source

National Science Foundation (NSF)

Abstract

Modern prosthetics use robotic gripping devices to return functionality to the user impaired by a lost hand. The key limitations of many commercially-available prosthetic arms are their high cost and their limited sensory information (such as pressure). To address this issue, the purpose of this research was to design and build a prosthetic arm that would be cost effective, and would also give the user feedback to how much force the gripper applies.

To allow the arm to be naturally controlled by the user, the opening and closing functions were controlled by flexing the top and bottom muscles in the forearm. The design of the prosthetic arm also had the ability to give the user sensory feedback through varying frequencies of a speaker placed against the skin. This work provided a strong basis for continued optimization for prosthetic arms that provides functionality and sensory information at an economical cost.

Biography

Robert Duke Adams is a Freshman Undergraduate at UMR who is majoring in Mechanical Engineering and studying pre-medicine courses. At UMR, Robert Adams is involved with Student Council as a representative, the Robotics Competition Team, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Scrubs (pre-med club), Fencing Club and the Honors Seminar. Robert also shadows physicians at a local hospital and is involved with ACES+ (a pre-med honors organization).

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Engineering poster session, First place

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 1:00 pm

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Apr 12th, 1:00 PM

Robotic Prosthetic Arm

Modern prosthetics use robotic gripping devices to return functionality to the user impaired by a lost hand. The key limitations of many commercially-available prosthetic arms are their high cost and their limited sensory information (such as pressure). To address this issue, the purpose of this research was to design and build a prosthetic arm that would be cost effective, and would also give the user feedback to how much force the gripper applies.

To allow the arm to be naturally controlled by the user, the opening and closing functions were controlled by flexing the top and bottom muscles in the forearm. The design of the prosthetic arm also had the ability to give the user sensory feedback through varying frequencies of a speaker placed against the skin. This work provided a strong basis for continued optimization for prosthetic arms that provides functionality and sensory information at an economical cost.