Title

Directly vitrifiable nanosize hydroxyapatite for removal of hazardous substances from aqueous wastes

Presenter Information

Alicia Canelos

Department

Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Science

Major

Nuclear Engineering

Research Advisor

Kim, Cheol-Woon, 1966-
Day, D. E.

Advisor's Department

Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Science

Second Advisor's Department

Materials Science and Engineering

Funding Source

Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education Grant of the United States Department of Energy (DE-FG07-09-ID14531)

Abstract

The safe disposal of aqueous waste solutions including nuclear waste streams is of concern since any radionuclides (such as Cs, Sr, Tc, U, Pu, and Am), hazardous or toxic metals (such as Cr, Pb, Cd, Hg, and As) that may be present can easily escape into the environment, causing a serious problem to human health. High surface area ( > 150 m2/g) hydroxyapatite (HA) particles were prepared by a unique and innovative method that consists of reacting (24 hours at 37°C) particles (45-75 µm) of a calcium borate glass with an aqueous solution containing phosphate ions. The effectiveness of this HA in removing the radionuclides and the hazardous metals from contaminated water was determined by chemically analyzing the feed and effluent solutions using an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ion removal effectiveness was not affected by the filtration methods, batch or column, and very high (e.g., Kd = 2 x 106 mL/g for U) ion removal was achieved for the ions tested. The “spent (used)” HA was successfully vitrified into a calcium iron phosphate glass by adding small amounts of Fe2O3 and P2O5 to the “spent” HA and melting the mixture at 1150°C for 2 hours. The chemical durability of the calcium iron phosphate glasses in deionized water at 90°C for 7 days was superior to that of the Environmental Assessment glass developed at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River for vitrifying nuclear waste.

Biography

Alicia is a junior attending the University of Missouri--Rolla majoring in nuclear engineering. She is actively involved in Phi Sigma Rho and is an alumna of the St. Pat’s Committee.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Engineering poster session, Second place

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 1:00 pm

Comments

Joint project with Leia Ponder and Stephanie Fesenmeyer

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Apr 12th, 1:00 PM

Directly vitrifiable nanosize hydroxyapatite for removal of hazardous substances from aqueous wastes

The safe disposal of aqueous waste solutions including nuclear waste streams is of concern since any radionuclides (such as Cs, Sr, Tc, U, Pu, and Am), hazardous or toxic metals (such as Cr, Pb, Cd, Hg, and As) that may be present can easily escape into the environment, causing a serious problem to human health. High surface area ( > 150 m2/g) hydroxyapatite (HA) particles were prepared by a unique and innovative method that consists of reacting (24 hours at 37°C) particles (45-75 µm) of a calcium borate glass with an aqueous solution containing phosphate ions. The effectiveness of this HA in removing the radionuclides and the hazardous metals from contaminated water was determined by chemically analyzing the feed and effluent solutions using an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ion removal effectiveness was not affected by the filtration methods, batch or column, and very high (e.g., Kd = 2 x 106 mL/g for U) ion removal was achieved for the ions tested. The “spent (used)” HA was successfully vitrified into a calcium iron phosphate glass by adding small amounts of Fe2O3 and P2O5 to the “spent” HA and melting the mixture at 1150°C for 2 hours. The chemical durability of the calcium iron phosphate glasses in deionized water at 90°C for 7 days was superior to that of the Environmental Assessment glass developed at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River for vitrifying nuclear waste.