Title

The Spatial Distribution of Indoor Mass Transfer

Presenter Information

Anthony Chiles

Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Major

Architectural Engineering

Research Advisor

Morrison, Glenn

Advisor's Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Funding Source

Missouri Heartland Alliance for Minority Participation

Abstract

When analyzing personal exposure to indoor pollutants, mathematical estimates are often used. An important question is the effect that the spatial distribution of pollutant transport has on personal exposure. Indoor concentrations of pollutants, such as ozone, are controlled by transport and uptake at indoor surfaces. To estimate indoor exposures, the average flux to indoor surfaces may not be sufficient. Instead an accurate assessment of the spatial distribution of surface uptake may be necessary. Therefore, the research proposed is to measure and evaluate the spatial distribution of mass transfer to indoor surfaces, under controlled ventilations conditions, in a room sized chamber. Once the experimental data is collected we can then ask if the average mass transfer coefficient is appropriate in estimating indoor pollutant concentrations or is the spatial distribution of mass transfer needed.

Biography

Anthony Chiles is a sophomore undergraduate student at the University of Missouri--Rolla, pursuing degrees in Civil and Architectural Engineering.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 9:00 am

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM

The Spatial Distribution of Indoor Mass Transfer

When analyzing personal exposure to indoor pollutants, mathematical estimates are often used. An important question is the effect that the spatial distribution of pollutant transport has on personal exposure. Indoor concentrations of pollutants, such as ozone, are controlled by transport and uptake at indoor surfaces. To estimate indoor exposures, the average flux to indoor surfaces may not be sufficient. Instead an accurate assessment of the spatial distribution of surface uptake may be necessary. Therefore, the research proposed is to measure and evaluate the spatial distribution of mass transfer to indoor surfaces, under controlled ventilations conditions, in a room sized chamber. Once the experimental data is collected we can then ask if the average mass transfer coefficient is appropriate in estimating indoor pollutant concentrations or is the spatial distribution of mass transfer needed.