Title

The Effects of Religiosity on Preconceived Value Judgments

Presenter Information

Daniel Lee Wilson Pope

Department

Psychological Science

Major

Psychology

Research Advisor

Canu, Will

Advisor's Department

Psychological Science

Abstract

The in-group bias suggests that “people of faith” will agree with others of the same religion and confirmation bias suggests that people will agree with others who share strongly held opinions, yet studies have seldom examined which bias is stronger. General Psychology students (n = 70) completed questionnaires regarding religiosity and their opinions on several controversial topics. Participants later chose sides regarding the death penalty in a specific criminal case after listening to two opinions: one from a person of opposing religion which matched the participant’s pre-existing death penalty beliefs, and another from a person of the participant’s religion that took an opposing view regarding the death penalty. It was hypothesized that high religiosity would predict siding with the same-religion peer (i.e., trumping death penalty opinions). Results suggest that this may be the case, future directions and the extent to which these findings can be generalized will be discussed.

Biography

Daniel Pope is a senior Psychology major at the University of Missouri--Rolla. He is the active president of the UMR branch of Psi Chi, a national honor society for psychology. He will be graduating in May ‘06 with a Bachelor’s of Science, after which Daniel is planning to pursue graduate study in Clinical Psychology.

Research Category

Humanities/Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 1:00 pm

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Apr 12th, 1:00 PM

The Effects of Religiosity on Preconceived Value Judgments

The in-group bias suggests that “people of faith” will agree with others of the same religion and confirmation bias suggests that people will agree with others who share strongly held opinions, yet studies have seldom examined which bias is stronger. General Psychology students (n = 70) completed questionnaires regarding religiosity and their opinions on several controversial topics. Participants later chose sides regarding the death penalty in a specific criminal case after listening to two opinions: one from a person of opposing religion which matched the participant’s pre-existing death penalty beliefs, and another from a person of the participant’s religion that took an opposing view regarding the death penalty. It was hypothesized that high religiosity would predict siding with the same-religion peer (i.e., trumping death penalty opinions). Results suggest that this may be the case, future directions and the extent to which these findings can be generalized will be discussed.