Title

The Role of Nitric Oxide and cGMP in Arabidopsis thaliana Root Growth

Presenter Information

Jacob Elmer

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences and Biochemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Aronstam, Robert

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

UMR Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE)

Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO), a known signal molecule in animal cells, is thought to act as a signaling molecule in plants. Within the plant cell, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) produces NO, which then activates guanylate cyclase to give cyclic guanylate monophosphate (cGMP) and a growth response. A. thaliana plants were grown initially on agar/MS media and then transferred to media containing experimental drugs. Root lengths were measured from digital images using Scion Image software. NO donor drugs, Spermine and DEA, enhanced root growth at low concentrations and inhibited growth at high concentrations. An NO scavenger, PTIO, and NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, decreased root growth. Pharmacological accumulation of cGMP by adding dibutryl cGMP, a guanylate cyclase inhibitory drug, or by blocking cGMP specific phosphodiesterase activity with IBMX enhanced root elongation. ODQ, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor and Carboxyl- PTIO, a scavenger of NO and NOS inhibitor, also affected root elongation.

Biography

Jacob is a junior attending the University of Missouri--Rolla majoring in Biochemical Engineering and Biological Sciences. He is the son of Jake Elmer and Valerie Rivera and is from Merritt Island, FL. On campus he is involved in Omega Chi Sigma, Phi Sigma, and the Helix Biological Society. He is currently employed as a LEAD PLA for Calc I and I and enjoys fishing. Jacob will pursue a career in advanced life support systems.

Research Category

Natural Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 1:00 pm

Comments

Joint project with Kristin Russell

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Apr 12th, 1:00 PM

The Role of Nitric Oxide and cGMP in Arabidopsis thaliana Root Growth

Nitric oxide (NO), a known signal molecule in animal cells, is thought to act as a signaling molecule in plants. Within the plant cell, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) produces NO, which then activates guanylate cyclase to give cyclic guanylate monophosphate (cGMP) and a growth response. A. thaliana plants were grown initially on agar/MS media and then transferred to media containing experimental drugs. Root lengths were measured from digital images using Scion Image software. NO donor drugs, Spermine and DEA, enhanced root growth at low concentrations and inhibited growth at high concentrations. An NO scavenger, PTIO, and NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, decreased root growth. Pharmacological accumulation of cGMP by adding dibutryl cGMP, a guanylate cyclase inhibitory drug, or by blocking cGMP specific phosphodiesterase activity with IBMX enhanced root elongation. ODQ, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor and Carboxyl- PTIO, a scavenger of NO and NOS inhibitor, also affected root elongation.